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STEM at EGSC - Undergraduate Research

STEM at EGSC - Undergraduate Research

Undergraduate Research

Undergraduate research is a High-Impact Student Experience. Beside fulfilling a requirement for graduating with a Bachelor of Science in Biology at EGSC, undergraduate research has multiple benefits for students such as better understanding of the course content, practice scientific inquiry and critical thinking. Finally, undergraduate research experience are always a great asset to add to your resume and will help you for application to professional schools (such as medical school) or find a job. 

EGSC students performing research enroll in the BIOL 4500 Undergraduate Research class.

Students present their research a local meetings.

Please contact the Biology Chair for more information.

 

Fall 2020 Student Presentations

Carley Stapleton worked on different aspects of a project to develop a monitoring system for detecting cyanobacteria in water. Cyanobacteria can produce toxins and can accumulate in farm ponds and lakes and other environmental water bodies and are considered an increasingly serious threat to environmental health. Carley performed her research under the supervision of Dr. J. Ed. Schneider.

 

 

Shanice McGuire’s research focused on foodborne diseases. The CDC estimates that each year roughly 1 in 6 Americans gets sick from foodborne diseases. This can result in up to 128,000 hospitalizations and 3,000 deaths annually. Three of the top five pathogens contributing to domestic foodborne illness are Salmonella, Campylobacter, and Staphylococcus species. Of these pathogens, Salmonella bacteria cause the most hospitalizations and deaths in the US each year. Additionally, pathogenic bacteria can acquire resistance to common antibiotics, making it more difficult and expensive to treat infections. Shanice McGuire is studying the prevalence of antibiotic resistance in bacteria from domestic chickens by isolating bacteria from manure samples and exposing these bacteria to multiple types of antibiotics. The presence of antibiotic resistant bacteria in chicken manure would indicate a high risk of transfer to humans through contact with live chickens or consumption of undercooked or improperly handled eggs and meat. Shanice worked under the supervision of Dr. Breana Simmons.

 

 

Contact:

Dr. John Cadle

Interim Biology Chair

jecadle@ega.edu

(478) 289-2187

 

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