Search

Vision Series

EGSC Vision Series

The East Georgia State College Vision Series is a privately funded initiative that underwrites academic and cultural enrichment programs for East Georgia State College students and the surrounding community.  Past programs include President and Mrs. Jimmy Carter, Dr. Maya Angelou, the Atlanta Pops, Ambassador Andrew Young and trips to the Fox Theatre and the High Museum in Atlanta.  Pocket Schedules for the Vision Series can be found at the following locations: Common Grounds, ACE Center, Library, Gym, Breezeway, Student Life area, Bobcat Villas & various location around Swainsboro. 

All of these events are free and open to the public.

Upcoming Events


Various Dates: Movie Series

Over the course of the year, we will be showing 10 films on various Tuesday evenings at 7PM in the Luck Flanders Gambrell Auditorium.  The community is invited and encouraged to come to the “movie nights.”  Our coffee shop, Common Grounds, will be open for your enjoyment.  There will be no cost for the movie.  The film series represents an alternative learning style for students and community members alike.  Each film will be introduced with a set of thought provoking questions and ideas that will inspire the viewer to think critically and look at the film from a different viewpoint.  Pocket Schedules for the movies can be found at the following locations: Common Grounds, ACE Center, Library, Gym, Breezeway, Student Life area, Bobcat Villas & various location around Swainsboro.

The film schedule for this year:

Date Film
September 3 A Beautiful Mind
October 15 The Way
October 29 Apollo 13
November 5 Casablanca
November 19 The Help
January 28 Favella Rising
February 18 Schindler’s List
March 11 42
April 8 Copperhead
April 8 The Butler
April 22 Sarah’s Key

 


September 24, 2013, 11AM:  Dr. Quint Newcomer

Quint Newcomer

Brief synopsis:  Part of the reason we encourage students to participate in education abroad programs is to develop “global awareness” and promote “global citizenship.” What does that mean to be a global citizen, with global mindset/awareness, and how can we, as educators, address this not just via education abroad but in all of the courses we offer for our students? How does that relate to the concept of ‘sustainability?’

This will be in conjunction with an art exhibit related to the EGSC Costa Rica trip this past spring. 

Dr. Newcomer is a faculty member at UGA and Director of UGA Costa Rica. His expertise is in economic opportunity in tropical rainforest ecology.

 


October 1, 2013, 11AM:  GSU Wind Ensemble

Robert Dunham conducting.

 


October 17, 2013, 11AM:  Billy Mills

Billy Mills

1964 Olympic Gold Medalist in 10,000 meter run.  Mills, a Native American (Lakota), has an inspirational story of how he trained to meet his goal and how those techniques can work for others.

 

 

 


November 5, 2013 11AM:  Trey Bruce

Nashville music producer, songwriter, and performer.  Winner of 13 ASCAP Awards, an Emmy Award, five  #1 singles, multiple top 5 and 10 hits and an Academy of country Music Song of the Year nomination.

Trey Bruce

 


November 14, 2013, 7PM:  Annie Moses Band

Dynamic Julliard-trained musical family who will provide an evening of wonderful entertainment.

Annie Moses Band

 


February 4, 2014, 11AM:  Roy Blount, Jr.

Southern writer and humorist.

Roy Blount, Jr.

 


[Postponed - stay tuned for updates]:  Symphony Orchestra Augusta

Symphony Orchestra Augusta

 


April 19, 2014, 2PM:  Lion King

Lion King

Fox Theatre (on a Saturday)

 


April 15, 2014, 11AM:  Celtic Duo

Fiddler Dana Lyn and guitarist Kyle Sanna, two young musicians who play acoustic music inspired by the Celtic tradition.

Celtic Duo

 

 

Previous Events


April 20, 2013: Day Trip to Sapelo Island

This small barrier island is a unique destination along Georgia’s famed “Colonial Coast.” Guests begin their day at the mainland visitor center, where they can learn about Sapelo’s cultural history, coastal wildlife, and complex beach and dunes systems. After a 30-minute ferry ride, they arrive at this 11-mile-long island. Guided tours highlight the African-American community of Hog Hammock, Reynolds Mansion, Nanny Goat Beach, University of Georgia Marine Institute and a restored 1820 lighthouse.

Groups may stay overnight on the island at the historic Reynolds Mansion or Cabretta Campground. The unusual and lovely Reynolds Mansion features marble sculptures, an ornately decorated Circus Room, murals by Athos Menaboni, a bowling lane, billiards, library and more. Cabretta Campground is sheltered by live oaks and is just a short walk to the beach.

For more information on Sapelo Island, visit the Georgia State Parks website.


February 28, 2013: John K. Derden, The Resurrection of Camp Lawton, the World's Largest Prison

John Derden, born into a military family, led a peripatetic childhood during his elementary and secondary school years, living in France, Germany, Oklahoma, Georgia, Hawaii, and Kentucky, before returning to his native Georgia for college. Earning degrees at Reinhardt University (A.A.) and the University of Georgia (B.S. Ed, M.A., and Ph.D.), he taught one year of high school and was a professor of history for thirty-one years at East Georgia State College.

When it opened in October of 1864, Camp Lawton was called "the world's largest prison." Yet, within only six weeks the stockade near Millen, Georgia, was evacuated in the face of advancing Federal troops under General Sherman. In that brief span of time, the prison served for as headquarters of the Confederate military prison system, witnessed hundreds of deaths, held a mock election for president, was involved in a sick exchange, hosted attempts to recruit Union POWs for Confederate service, and withstood escape attempts. Burned by Sherman's troops following its evacuation in late November of 1864, the prison was never reoccupied. Over the next century and a half the memory of Camp Lawton almost completely disappeared.

In 2010, the Confederate military prison was resurrected, so to speak, as a result of a media event showcasing to the public the results of recent archeological investigations. This book not only summarizes the initial archeological findings but also is the first full-length, documented history of Camp Lawton. The author draws from material in the National Archives and other repositories and libraries across the nation, published and unpublished accounts of ex-POWs, family stories, and relevant secondary sources to produce a narrative that examines the experience of all those involved in the history of the prison administrators, guards, POWs, and the local populace and places the history of the prison in the broader context of the Civil War. Camp Lawton is significant because its history represents a microcosm of the POW issue during the Civil War, and it illuminates the treatment of Union POWs, the abilities and the disabilities of the Confederacy in the last stages of the war, the impact of Sherman's March, divisions among the Confederate populace and leadership, the human toll of the conflict, and the amazing ability of the past to surprise the present.

Read more about the excavation project and history at Georgia Southern: Camp Lawton.


February 23, 2013: Day Trip to The High Museum, Atlanta - Frida & Diego: Passion, Politics and Painting

Few artists have captured the public's imagination like Mexican painter Frida Kahlo (1907–1954) and her husband, the Mexican painter and muralist Diego Rivera (1886–1957). The myths that surrounded them during their lifetime arose not only from their significant body of work, but also from their active participation in the historical happenings around them.

Frida & Diego positions the artists' work within the political and artistic contexts of their time. Their art speaks of a fierce loyalty to and pride in Mexico, the ideals of the 1910 Mexican Revolution and their commitment to the conditions of the common man.

The exhibition features more than 75 works primarily drawn from the collection of Mexico's Dolores Olmedo as well as the Jacques and Natasha Gelman Collection of Mexican Art.

The High Museum of Art will be the only U.S. venue for this exhibition, and is accompanied by a full-color catalogue. The exhibition premiers at the Art Gallery of Ontario in the fall of 2012.

To read more about this exhibition, visit the High Museum website.


February 14, 2013: Yoonie Han

South Korean pianist Yoonie Han is praised for her “flowing tones, poetic phrasing, and heavenly singing melodies” (Cincinnati Enquirer). She has won top prizes from distinguished international competitions and the highest accolades for her performances in major concert halls in the U.S. and around the world.

In the 2011–12 season, Ms. Han made European debuts with the Berliner Symphoniker at the Berlin Philharmonic Hall, the Bergamo Festival in Italy, and Salle Cortot in Paris. In 2012–13, she embarks upon a recital tour to Steinway & Sons’ locations in the U.S. and Europe, Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., Concertgebouw in Amsterdam, Slovak Philharmonic Hall, and solos with Philippe Entremont and the Boca Raton Symphonia.

In 2009, Ms. Han was honored with the Gawon Music Award as the “most brilliant pianist aged 17 to 31 of any nationality who possesses the most promising potential for global prominence.” She is the first-prize winner of the Washington International Piano Competition (2011), the Fulbright Concerto Competition (2011), Juilliard’s Gina Bachauer Piano Competition (2008), the World Piano Competition (2008), and the Kosciuszko Chopin Competition (2005), and has garnered major prizes at the Helsinki Maj Lind International Piano Competition and Milan Concorso Pianistico Ettore Pozzoli Internaziole. Following her 2001 grand-prize award in the Korea National Music Competition, the Korean Ministry of Culture named her its “most promising young artist.”

Ms. Han made her solo debut with the Seoul Philharmonic at age 13, and has since performed with the Buffalo Philharmonic, Helsinki Philharmonic, Houston Symphony, Banff Festival Orchestra, and I Pomeriggi Musicali di Milan, under such maestros as JoAnn Falletta, Leif Segerstam, and Lior Shambadal. She has performed at Lincoln Center’s Alice Tully Hall, Carnegie Hall, Finlandia Hall, Chicago’s Dame Myra Hess Concert Series, Se-jong Performing Arts Center in Korea, and Villa Bertramka Mozart Museum in the Czech Republic. Her performances have also been broadcast on WQXR-New York and on National Public Radio’s “Artist Showcases.”

Ms. Han received a Bachelor’s degree from the Curtis Institute of Music studying with Eleanor Sokoloff, and a Master of Music degree from The Juilliard School as a pupil of Robert McDonald. She continues studies with Jean Saulnier.

Read more about Yoonie Han at her website.


January 29, 2013: Charles Martin

Charles Martin earned his B.A. in English from Florida State University, and his M.A. in Journalism and Ph.D. in Communication from Regent University. He served one year at Hampton University as an adjunct professor in the English department and as a doctoral fellow at Regent. In 1999, he left a career in business to pursue his writing.

He and his wife, Christy, live a stone's throw from the St. John's River in Jacksonville, Florida, with their three boys: Charlie, John T. and Rives.

Charles has written 8 novels:

    The Dead Don't Dance
    Wrapped in Rain
    Maggie
    When Crickets Cry
    Chasing Fireflies
    Where the River Ends
    The Mountain Between Us
    Thunder and Rain

Read more about Charles Martin at his website.


November 29, 2012: Mary Bragg, Singer/Songwriter

Note: Mary Bragg will perform at 7:00pm in the Luck F. Gambrell Auditorium

Raised as the youngest of four children in a big musical family in Swainsboro, Georgia, Bragg lived in a number of Southern musical capitals – Athens, Atlanta, and Nashville – before settling in New York in 2004. Her music is consequently a seamless hybrid of her southern Americana roots and the downtown New York singer-songwriter community of which she has become a key member.

Tattoos and Bruises follows her sophomore release, Sugar (2007), which was produced by Darius Jones, and recorded just a block away from her home in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. Her debut album, Certain Simple Things (2004), was co-written, engineered and produced in Athens, Georgia, by Dave Haywood (Lady Antebellum).

Drawing comparisons to Patty Griffin and Mindy Smith, Bragg has come to inhabit her own unique fusion of American musical forms, clearly heard and felt on Tattoos and Bruises.

Read more about Mary and listen to her songs at her website.


November 13, 2012: SFC Sammy Davis, Congressional Medal of Honor Recipient

From Davis' Congressional Medal of Honor Citation:

Rank and organization: Sergeant, U.S. Army, Battery C, 2d Battalion, 4th Artillery, 9th Infantry Division.

Place and date: West of Cai Lay, Republic of Vietnam, 18 November 1967. Entered service at: Indianapolis, Ind. Born: 1 November 1946, Dayton, Ohio.

Citation: For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life and beyond the call of duty. Sgt. Davis (then Pfc.) distinguished himself during the early morning hours while serving as a cannoneer with Battery C, at a remote fire support base. At approximately 0200 hours, the fire support base was under heavy enemy mortar attack. Simultaneously, an estimated reinforced Viet Cong battalion launched a fierce ground assault upon the fire support base.

The attacking enemy drove to within 25 meters of the friendly positions. Only a river separated the Viet Cong from the fire support base.

Detecting a nearby enemy position, Sgt. Davis seized a machinegun and provided covering fire for his gun crew, as they attempted to bring direct artillery fire on the enemy. Despite his efforts, an enemy recoilless rifle round scored a direct hit upon the artillery piece. The resultant blast hurled the gun crew from their weapon and blew Sgt. Davis into a foxhole. He struggled to his feet and returned to the howitzer, which was burning furiously.

Ignoring repeated warnings to seek cover, Sgt. Davis rammed a shell into the gun. Disregarding a withering hail of enemy fire directed against his position, he aimed and fired the howitzer which rolled backward, knocking Sgt. Davis violently to the ground. Undaunted, he returned to the weapon to fire again when an enemy mortar round exploded within 20 meters of his position, injuring him painfully. Nevertheless, Sgt. Davis loaded the artillery piece, aimed and fired. Again he was knocked down by the recoil.

In complete disregard for his safety, Sgt. Davis loaded and fired 3 more shells into the enemy. Disregarding his extensive injuries and his inability to swim, Sgt. Davis picked up an air mattress and struck out across the deep river to rescue 3 wounded comrades on the far side. Upon reaching the 3 wounded men, he stood upright and fired into the dense vegetation to prevent the Viet Cong from advancing. While the most seriously wounded soldier was helped across the river, Sgt. Davis protected the 2 remaining casualties until he could pull them across the river to the fire support base. Though suffering from painful wounds, he refused medical attention, joining another howitzer crew which fired at the large Viet Cong force until it broke contact and fled. Sgt. Davis' extraordinary heroism, at the risk of his life, are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself and the U.S. Army.

For more information on SFC Sammy Davis, visit his website.


November 1, 2012: Dr. Mark Welford, "The Mystery of the Black Death"

Dr. Mark R. Welford is an Associate Professor of Geography in the Department of Geology and Geography at Georgia Southern University. He was born and raised in United Kingdom. He received his B.Sc. in Geography from Coventry Polytechnic, U.K. (1986), a M.Sc. in Geography from the University of Idaho (1988) and a Ph.D. in Geography from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign (1993).

He is currently working with Dr. Brian Bossak on a fundamental yet unanswered question at the intersection of anthropology, biology, environmental science, geography, and history: What caused the Medieval Black Death (MBD), one of the greatest epidemics in terms of scope, mortality, and societal change? Despite Yersin's 1894 proclamation that the MBD was an episode of bubonic plague and widespread early adoption of this etiologic paradigm by historians, the actual cause of the MBD has never been confirmed and is still a matter of intense debate. A recent reinvigorated research focus on this lethal epidemic has provided a growing legacy of peer-reviewed investigational evidence at odds with a Y. pestis based etiologic paradigm.


October 4, 2012: Symphony Orchestra Augusta

Symphony Orchestra Augusta will perform both at 11:00am and at 7:00pm.