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King featured in MOMents Magazine

King featured in MOMents Magazine

by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) | December 02, 2015
Last Edited: January 25, 2016 by Katelyn Moore

The following is an excerpt from the article GO girl! by Ashlee Hooks Corbin for MOMents Magazine, published by The Statesboro Herald. The article was originally published in the December 2015 edition.
   Many children battle self-esteem issues during their school years. This often results in low self-confidence as adults, leading to poor choices and regrets later in life. However, Stacey King is working to break this cycle through her non-profit organization, Our Girls Rock Too!
   While Stacey didn’t have confidence issues as a child, positive programs designed for young ladies weren’t available to her. The 30-year-old director of the Physical Education Complex and Military Resource Center at East Georgia State College saw the need for a local program to help girls build their self-esteem and confidence, and in May 2012, she began working with many community members to satisfy that need.
   Stacey grew up in Portal with her mom, dad, brother and two sisters. She is a 2004 graduate of Portal High School and graduated from Georgia Southern University in 2008 with a Bachelor of Science in health and physical education, following that with a master’s degree in kinesiology in 2009. She attributes this success to the positive, loving community in which she grew up.
   “Being surrounded in this environment has had a significant impact on my character development,” she said. “I was always told that I was beautiful, smart and could accomplish anything.”
   Despite that, Stacey did have some obstacles to overcome when she was younger.
   “I found myself being bullied for my clothes and even for being smart. As a result, I found myself in need of the encouragement that my community would one day provide.”
   Stacey hopes that OGR2 can give girls the self-confidence they need to cancel out the effects of bullying. By setting an example of good self-confidence, receiving a higher education and focusing on mentoring these young girls, she feels that she can reach these girls, ages 7 to 18, in a way that a relative may not, giving them positive reinforcement and building them up to give them the tools necessary to lead a successful, empowered life.
   “My goal is to be a guide and a mentor for the young ladies in the program and to create an environment of love and lifelong friendships,” she said. “… I want to help open doors of young ladies to discover their talents, accept their beauty, excel in education and value the importance of embracing and uplifting each other to reach the common goal of success.”
   To read the rest of the story, visit the online edition of MOMents Magazine here and click on the December edition.